Reflection Essay

Reflection Essay
Introduction

The professional work of nurses is closely intertwined with a number of ethical issues and problems in terms of interpersonal relationships with patients. In this respect, the case with Jane Smith is particularly noteworthy because it reveals the full extent to which nurses’ work can be complicated because often they have to turn apart between their professional duties and communication and relationships with patients. At the same time, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that the case of Jane Smith reveals the fact that nurses have to be very careful in their actions and they cannot make any actions without consideration possible effects of their action or inaction. In this respect, it is important to point out that the professional work of nurses raises a problem of the effective interaction of patients and fulfillment of their professional duties.

On analyzing the case of Jane Smith, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that Jane Smith is apparently suffering from the changes in her position and her return back to home raises a number of problems. In this respect, it is worth mentioning the fact that Jane Smith needs counseling services to get the professional assistance from the part of psychologists and nurses. Therefore, she needed the communication with nurses and health care professionals. In fact, what she needed was the communication and attention from the part of health care professionals or any person capable to listen to her and give a piece of advice or just to calm her down. In such a situation, her decision to leave her, when she has just started to talk about her problems was apparently incorrect because it led to the refusal of Jane Smith to continue communication with her. In such a way, my decision led to the failure of my attempts to counsel Jane Smith, while the nurse had a chance to establish positive interpersonal relationships with the patient and to help her to cope with her problems. In such a context, it is important to dwell upon the analysis of the situation and case of Jane Smith and possible outcomes depending on the choice of actions from my part.

The analysis of the current situation and my actions

What

First of all, on analyzing the case of Jane Smith and her actions, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that her actions were determined by her belief that professional duties have to be fulfilled properly. To put it more precisely, the nurse had to help her colleague to make the beds because it was her professional duty. At the moment, when her colleague asked her about the help, the nurse was just sitting and talking to Jane Smith. Therefore, the nurse considered that the nurse did not do her professional work and the nurse was just chattering to a patient. Therefore, her actions were quite logical and met her professional duties. To put it more precisely, the nurse abandoned Jane Smith and went to the next bay and help her colleague with the beds. In fact, it was her professional duty because the nurse had to do the job nurses are obliged to do in terms of their professional work.

So what

So I had to go to make beds in the next bay as my colleague asked me. However, to do this I had to stop talking to Jane Smith. In fact, the nurse had to interrupt her and stop the conversation to leave performing her professional duties to make beds in the next bay. In this regard, I should say that the nurse have little options to choose from because my actions were defined by her professional duties as a nurse. At the same time, the nurse viewed her communication with Jane Smith as a regular conversation but not as a part of her professional duties. This is why the nurse abandoned the conversation when the nurse had to make beds in the next department, which comprised a part of her professional duties because the nurse had to perform my professional duties maintaining the order in the bay and helping her colleagues as well as patients to keep the bay in order and to keep it clean and neat. Therefore, the nurse’s decision to help her colleague to make beds was reasonable and justified by her professional duties.

Now what

On the other hand, the nurse’s decision to help her colleague with the beds led to the unwillingness of Jane Smith to communicate with her. She refused to resume the conversation anymore and the nurse had problems with the communication with her. In such a way, it was obvious that my decision led to negative effects on my relationships with the patient. In this regard, it is important to take into consideration the fact that the patient suffered from a serious psychological trauma because she probably had no one to share her problems with and my refusal to talk to her might have a negative impact on her psychological state. Anyway, my refusal to communicate with Jane Smith had a negative impact on the patient and, in this regard, the nurse had violated by professional duties and responsibilities because the patient’s health should be my primary concern. Nevertheless, the maintenance of order and keeping the facility neat are a part of my professional duties as well.

Alternative way of actions

On the other hand I could act in a different way. In fact, the nurse could wait and keep talking to Jane Smith refusing to go to make beds immediately when my colleague asked me for help. In such a context, it is important to analyze the alternative behavior from my part in relation to Jane Smith and its possible effects and ethical considerations.

What

Jane Smith needed to talk about her problems and, therefore, the nurse had to stay with her and to talk about her problems. At any rate, the nurse had at least to listen to her and let her talk all apprehensions and problems she had at home. The patient was apparently anxious about her returning back home. In such a way, the nurse had to choose the different model of behavior because the patient needed the professional assistance of the nurse, who should provide the patient with the counseling services. At any rate, the nurses needed just to listen to the patient and help her if she could.

So what

Therefore, the nurse had to stay with her and to listen all her problems and, probably, give some recommendations and consult Jane Smith to ease her sufferings. In this regard, the nurse should remember that her professional duties were not limited by the mere cleaning and keeping the bay in order but she was also obliged to focus on patients’ health, their needs, wants and expectations. One of the primary concerns of the professional nurse is to help patients. Patients’ health should be the primary concern of the professional nurse. Therefore, the nurse should listen to Jane Smith and, if possible, to give her a piece of advice or just calm her down and insure that Jane Smith would be all right when she returned back home.

Now what

As the nurse failed to listen to Jane Smith and establish positive interpersonal relationships with the patient, she had to attempt to change their relationships and to help the patient. To put it more precisely, the nurse needs to regain Jane Smith’s respect to help her to communicate and talk about all her problems performing the role of consultant and to provide the patient with psychological help. In this respect, the nurse has to pay a particular attention to understanding major problems of Jane Smith. Jane Smith feels anxiety because of problems she can face in the course of her returning back home. She faces substantial difficulties with returning to her normal life in her family environment. In such a situation, the nurse should not just listen and understand problems that disturbed the patient but also the nurse had to provide the patient with an effective strategy to overcome her anxiety, fears and to cope with her problems at home.

Moreover, the nurse should understand whether there are some threats to the patient in her family environment. In this regard, the nurse should involve social workers to help the patient to cope with her problems at home. For instance, Jane Smith could have suffered from abuse from the part of her family members. Therefore, social workers could help Jane Smith to cope with this problem but social workers had to draw their attention to Jane Smith’s problems through mediation of the nurse. In such a way, the nurse should act in a different way to perform her professional duties properly. In this regard, the nurse should pay more attention to Jane Smith and her needs to perform her professional duties well.

Conclusion

Thus, taking into account all above mentioned, it is important to place emphasis on the fact that the behavior of the nurse in regard to Jane Smith was incorrect. In this regard, it is worth mentioning the fact that the nurse failed to perform her duties well because she was torn apart between the need to help her colleague and the desire of Jane Smith to talk to her. In addition, it should be said that the development of positive interpersonal relationships with patients is of the utmost importance because it contributes to the improvement of the health care services being delivered to patients and prevents the risk of conflicts between health care professionals and patients. In such a situation, health care professionals should pay a lot of attention to needs and wants of patients to help them to cope with their difficulties. In this regard, the nurse needs to pay a lot of attention to problems of Jane Smith and, if necessary to appeal to social workers to help the patient to cope with her problems. Moreover, the patient probably needed to have a conversation with someone to share her anxiety and problems with someone and the nurse should help her in this regard.



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